Click here for the Home Page Click here for the Home Page Click here for the Home Page Click here for the Home Page Click here for the Home Page Click here for the Home Page Click here for the Home Page Click here for the Home Page Click here for the Home Page Click here for the Home Page Click here for the Home Page Click here for the Home Page Click here for the Home Page

Collection Details


Collection Name: Role of the National Security Adviser Oral History
Repository Name: Brookings Institution. Foreign Policy Studies Program. [Repository Details]
Repository Location: Washington, District of Columbia, United States
URL: http://www.brookings.edu/fp/research/projects/nsc/transcripts/19991025.htm
Material Formats: [5 documents with text]
Description: Since the Kennedy administration, the assistant to the president for national security affairs (a.k.a. "the national security adviser") has played two roles: manager ("honest broker") of the day-to-day policy process and substantive policy adviser. Presidents clearly want both, but the roles are in tension. Specifically, an assistant who pushes his own views too strongly risks losing the trust of a secretary of state (or defense) who has a different opinion. Some national security advisers have balanced these roles adroitly. Others have not, generating discord within the president's senior advisory team.
Estimated Total of Interviews: 1
Interviews: [5 interview(s) listed in this collection]
Broad Subjects: U.S. Politics; Politics
ASP Subjects: District of Columbia; National Security Council (U.S.)--History; National security--Law and legislation--United States; National security--United States; Oral history; Presidents--United States--Staff; U.S. National Security Council; United States; White House, Washington, DC
Collection Code: OHC0001411