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Search results: Found 7 collection(s).
Search string: Repository by Code=OHR000717


Columbia River Dissenters Series Vancouver, Washington, United States. The following oral histories were conducted by the Oregon Historical Society, in cooperation with the Center for Columbia River History staff and document the contemporary history of the Columbia River Basin. The content of the oral histories highlight “dissent on the Columbia” and include the voices of men and women who have found fault with the way the Columbia River system has been managed and used. These interviews are made possible in part by a grant from the U.S. Department of Education. [View Collection Details] [View Repository Details] [12 interview(s) listed in this collection]

Columbia Slough, Oregon Oral History Archive Vancouver, Washington, United States. [View Collection Details] [View Repository Details] [27 interview(s) listed in this collection]

Cottage Grove, Oregon Oral History Archive Vancouver, Washington, United States. A little over one hundred years since the onset of white settlement, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers transformed the valley with a series of dams they hoped would control the annual flooding common to the region. Cottage Grove, a town of about 8,000 residents sits between two of these dams, Cottage Grove and Dorena. This Web site examines the history of Cottage Grove through primary documents, maps, historic photos, and oral interviews. We invite you to explore the changing nature of the Cottage Grove community. [View Collection Details] [View Repository Details] [9 interview(s) listed in this collection]

Moses Lake, Washington Oral History Archive Vancouver, Washington, United States. This web site extends a project initiated by the Center for Columbia River History and funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities from 1995 through 1997. The project assisted museums in Moses Lake, Washington, and Sandpoint, Idaho, to create traveling exhibits that explored the essence of their community's history since the building of the big dams on the Columbia River. The U.S. Department of Education provided funding to create the web site, adapted from the original exhibit produced by the Adam East Museum in Moses Lake. [View Collection Details] [View Repository Details] [20 interview(s) listed in this collection]

Sandpoint, Idaho Oral History Archive Vancouver, Washington, United States. Interviews were conducted in Sandpoint, Idaho, and are housed at the Bonner County Historical Society. Interviews with Jonathan Coe and Brenda Hammond are also available at the Idaho State Historical Society. [View Collection Details] [View Repository Details] [10 interview(s) listed in this collection]

Umatilla, Oregon Oral History Archive Vancouver, Washington, United States. The oral history archive contains written transcripts of interviews conducted for the Umatilla Community History Project. [View Collection Details] [View Repository Details] [14 interview(s) listed in this collection]

Women and Timber: The Pacific Northwest Logging Community, 1920-1998 Vancouver, Washington, United States. his project pursued the forgotten histories of the mothers, wives, sisters, and daughters of Pacific Northwest loggers from 1920 to 1997, primarily through oral history interviews. A dangerous, labor-intensive, and male-dominated occupation, logging was, until very recently, central to the Pacific Northwest's extractive-based economy and to what historian Carlos Schwantes, in his introduction to The Pacific Northwest, An Interpretive History, has criticized as a regional history limited by its preoccupation with heroic men engaged in heroic battles to tame or subdue nature. Consistent with Schwantes' characterization of Pacific Northwest historiography, most historical studies about logging focus on the logistics and lore of the logger and his occupation. Few scholars have turned their attention to the experiences of women affiliated with loggers through kinship and marriage. This project explores womens' roles as key participants in the development and maintenance of the logging community and culture that has, in many ways, helped define Pacific Northwest history. [View Collection Details] [View Repository Details] [14 interview(s) listed in this collection]