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Search results: Found 59 collection(s).
Search string: Repository by Code=OHR001085


African American Life and Culture Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States. James Eddie McCoy interviews regarding African Americans in Granville County, N.C. Since 1981, McCoy of Oxford, N.C., has conducted interviews with elderly black citizens from all walks of life in Granville County, N.C. Nearly all of the interviewees are more than 80 years old; some are over 100. These interviews bring to life the tobacco fields of Antioch, the cotton plantations of Oak Hill, church services at Black Cat, and the hustle and bustle of black neighborhoods like Grab-All in Oxford. They tell what daily life was like in the black orphanage at Oxford, at Mary Potter School, and in lumber camps and cotton fields. [View Collection Details] [View Repository Details]

Black High School Principals Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States. This series contains interviews with African-American high school principals across the state of North Carolina. The interviews were conducted by Goldie F. Wells as part of a research project for her doctoral dissertation, A Comparison of the Role Perceptions of Black High School Principals. folder M-i contains information on the research project. [View Collection Details] [View Repository Details]

Business History: Hickory Springs Manufacturing Company Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States. Tapes and transcripts of 55 interviews with 49 individuals about Hickory Springs Manufacturing Company, the families in positions of leadership in the company, the furniture industry, and the region. In addition, there are two folders of interview highlights and two folders of research material on the company. [View Collection Details] [View Repository Details]

Business History: Hostile Takeover Project Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States. Interviews in which top management officials at Goodyear Tire and Rubber Company, Heublein, Inc., Microdot, Inc., and Richardson-Vicks, Inc. talk about their experiences during attempts at hostile takeovers of their companies. Discussions center around takeover attempts as related both to the individual organizations and to the broader effects of this business practice on the country's economic health. They provide a valuable insight into this new development in corporate life in the United States. [View Collection Details] [View Repository Details]

Business History: North Carolina Business History Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States. Business history interviews with leaders of traditional and emergent North Carolina industries, such as furniture, banking, tobacco products, textiles, poultry, food and food services, tourism, pharmaceuticals, computers, and steel. Interviewees describe the origins and evolution of their companies as well as the changes and problems they currently confront. They are also asked about the impact of businesses on the communities in which they operate and about the regional, national, and global developments that will affect their future prospects. The first interviews for this project, I-5 through I-12, were conducted by Walter E. Campbell. Project coordinator is Peter Coclanis, professor of history at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. [View Collection Details] [View Repository Details]

Center for Creative Leadership Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States. Interviews with staff of the Center for Creative Leadership (CCL) in Greensboro, N.C. Interviews with 30 staff members were conducted in 1998 and 1999 in a project funded by CCL and coordinated by Joseph Mosnier. Excerpts from the interviews were published in January 2000 in a book entitled Herding Cats, An Oral History of the Center for Creative Leadership. [View Collection Details] [View Repository Details]

Fellowship of Southern Churchmen, 1983-1985 Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States. This series consists of more than 40 interviews with members of the Fellowship of Southern Churchmen (FSC), mostly conducted from 1983 to 1985. The interviewer was Dallas A. Blanchard, who received funding for the project from the Society for the Scientific Study of Religion. Interviews deal with the interviewees' participation in the FSC, and with their previous and subsequent activities. [View Collection Details] [View Repository Details]

Foundation History: Race, Poverty, and the North Carolina Fund Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States. The North Carolina Fund, established in 1963, was a forerunner of Lyndon Johnson's War on Poverty. Funded by the Ford Foundation, the Z. Smith Reynolds Foundation, the Mary Reynolds Babcock Foundation, and federal agencies, the Fund was a bold experiment in public-private cooperation. The North Carolina Fund not only established and supported community action agencies that still operate today, but it operated manpower development programs, conducted important research on poverty, trained community organizers, and sent racially integrated teams of student volunteers into rural communities to help local people fight poverty and racism. [View Collection Details] [View Repository Details]

Individual Biographies Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States. The collection of biographical interviews is an ongoing project of the Southern Oral History Program. This project seeks to restore the balance personal letters and diaries, which are becoming increasingly scarce, once brought to the public record, by interviewing notable men and women in North Carolina and the southern region. Interviews with educators, business leaders, political activists, professional workers, and authors and artists are included in this series. The interviews have been conducted by the program staff and by students and faculty whose research in southern history utilized oral sources. The interviews are biographical in nature, although they may concentrate on specific events or periods within the lifetime of the respondent. In some cases there is more than one interview with an individual, each covering a different aspect of his or her career. A biographical sketch is often filed with each interview, or with the first interview if there are several for one individual. [View Collection Details] [View Repository Details]

Labor: Italo-American Community Project Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States. The Italo-American Community Project interviews were done by Gary Ross Mormino for his dissertation, "The City Upon the Hill: An Italo- American Community, 1882-1955" (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 1977), about an Italian-American neighborhood in St. Louis, Mo. Many of these interviews are life histories that include information about the interviewee's work. They also reveal a wide range of community interests and activities. [View Collection Details] [View Repository Details]

Labor: Labor History Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States. Most of the labor history interviews were done by the staff of the Southern Oral History Program. They focus on the growth and development of organized labor in the southeast beginning in 1940. A number of the interviews were done with leaders of textile unions in the southeast and contain much information on individual strikes, organizing tactics, problems within the unions, and difficulties with mill owners. Some of those interviewed spoke in more general terms about life in mill villages. [View Collection Details] [View Repository Details]

Labor: Miners for Democracy Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States. These interviews concentrate on the Miners for Democracy movement within the United Mine Workers Union in West Virginia, 1970-1972. George W. Hopkins interviewed movement leaders for his dissertation, "The Miners for Democracy: Insurgency in the United Mine Workers of America, 1970-1972" (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 1976). Interviews with Joseph "Chip" Yablonski, Jr., Arnold Miller, Mike Trbovich, and other United Mine Workers leaders focus on the miners' movement, its internal problems, and the issues at the mines that spurred the creation of the movement. [View Collection Details] [View Repository Details]

Labor: University of North Carolina Foodworkers' Strikes, 1974-1975, 1979 Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States. These interviews focus on the University of North Carolina foodworkers' strikes against the University of North Carolina Food Service, February-March 1969 (interviews E-55-82), and against SAGA Food Service, November-December 1969 (interviews E-83-92). The participants in the strikes were primarily African-American women, although many university groups ultimately became involved. The individuals interviewed include foodworkers, members of the Black Student Movement, members of the Southern Student Organizing Committee, and other students, mediators, lawyers, faculty members, and university officials. The interviews establish the chronology and role of each participant and address the issues of class, race, and gender raised by the strikes. Other topics include student protests in the 1960s, university-town relations, and the university's position in state government. [View Collection Details] [View Repository Details]

Legal Professions Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States. The interviews in this series were conducted by students of the University of North Carolina School of Law with prominent lawyers and judges in North Carolina. Most of the interviews deal with the interviewees' families and personal lives as well as with their legal careers and thoughts about the law and the legal profession. Many interviews discuss college and law school experiences at the University of North Carolina and elsewhere, memorable cases, and views on legal ethics. Several interviews, especially those with African-American lawyers or Native-American lawyers and judges, address issues of racial segregation, school integration, and civil rights law. Other interviews address the careers of women in the legal profession. Several interviewees discussed their ideas about the death penalty. Some of the lawyers interviewed are also politicians; several have served in the North Carolina General Assembly or in the United States Congress. [View Collection Details] [View Repository Details]

Notable North Carolinians Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States. The materials in this series are part of an on-going project to interview men and women in North Carolina who have made significant contributions to business, the arts, education, and politics. [View Collection Details] [View Repository Details]

Piedmont Industrialization, 1974-1980 Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States. This series consists almost entirely of tapes and transcripts of interviews conducted by the Southern Oral History Program between 1974 and 1981 for the project "Perspectives on Industrialization: The Piedmont Crescent of Industry, 1900-1940," funded primarily by the National Endowment for the Humanities. The project focuses on the impact of industrialization in seven main areas: Badin, Burlington, Bynum, Catawba County, Charlotte, and Durham, N.C., and Greenville, S.C. There are also interviews (Series H.8.) with workers from such communities as Carrboro, Greensboro, Gastonia, and Marion, N.C., a short series of tapes relating to Farmville, N.C. (Series H.9.), and interviews relating to the textile workers' strike in Elizabethton, Tenn., in 1929 (Series H.10). Topics include the development of various industries in these regions, especially textiles, tobacco, hosiery, and furniture. The interviews deal with the work experiences of the workers in these industries and with numerous other facets of their daily lives. [View Collection Details] [View Repository Details]

Rural Electrification, 1984-1985 Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States. From June 1984 to May 1985, the North Carolina Association of Electric Cooperatives conducted interviews with more than 40 North Carolinians in all parts of the state about the differences electricity had made in their daily lives. The Rural Electrification Project, directed by Lu Ann Jones, a former graduate student at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, was partially funded by the North Carolina Humanities Committee, and was produced to coincide with the 50th anniversary of the Rural Electrification Administration in 1985. [View Collection Details] [View Repository Details]

Southern Communities: Listening for a Change - African Americans in Hancock County Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States. Interviews conducted by Mark Schultz between 1988 and 2001 in and around Hancock County, Ga., about the primary ways that white and black lives actually intersected there in the years between 1910 and 1950. Interviewees include black and white landowners, tenants, lumber workers, tradesmen, soldiers, teachers, and preachers; men and women; and migrants to northern cities and lifelong residents of the county. These interviews form the basis for Schultz's Ph.D. dissertation, Unsolid South: An Oral History of Race, Class, and Geography in Hancock County, Georgia, 1910-1950, submitted to the faculty of the Division of the Social Sciences, Department of History, University of Chicago, 1999, and for a forthcoming book. [View Collection Details] [View Repository Details]

Southern Communities: Listening for a Change - Asian Voices Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States. An oral history project documenting the immigration stories of South Asians in Chapel Hill and Carrboro, N.C. The project was conceived by Andrew Jilani and funded in November 1998 by the North Carolina Humanities Council. [View Collection Details] [View Repository Details]

Southern Communities: Listening for a Change - Bob Gilgor's Mighty Tigers -- Oral Histories of Chapel Hill's Lincoln High School Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States. Interviews by Bob Gilgor, a retired doctor and Chapel Hill, N.C., documentarian, with teachers, staff, and alumni from Lincoln High School, Chapel Hill's historically black secondary institution. The school was closed during the implementation of school desegregation in Chapel Hill in 1962. Interviewees discuss African American life and race relations in Chapel Hill, as well as education, discipline, extracurricular activities, and social life in high school before and after school integration. [View Collection Details] [View Repository Details]

Southern Communities: Listening for a Change - Cambodian Community in Greensboro, NC Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States. These interviews by folklorist Barbara Lau focus on the experience of growing up Cambodian in Greensboro. They are part of Lau's ongoing research project concerning Cambodian refugee communities in North Carolina. Since 1992, Lau has been documenting folklife traditions, community and family ceremonies, and personal experiences of Cambodians in North Carolina. Photographs, videotapes, and audiotapes documenting this work may be found in the Barbara Lau Collection (#20055), Southern Folklife Collection. [View Collection Details] [View Repository Details]

Southern Communities: Listening for a Change - History 170, Oral History Course Project: Desegregation and the Inner Life of the Chapel Hill Schools Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States. This is a collection of interviews by University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill graduate and undergraduate students who participated in an oral history course in spring 2001. The students looked closely at Chapel Hill's troubled effort to dismantle a system of racial segregation in the public schools; the fraught process of creating new, integrated institutions; and the ways in which the memory of those experiences shapes the inner life of schools to this day. The particular focus of the project was Lincoln High School, Chapel Hill's historically black secondary institution, which was closed upon the implementation of the desegregation plan. Interviewees include former teachers, students, and administrators of Lincoln High School and Chapel Hill High School, which was integrated in 1962. Included is an interview with school board member Edwin Caldwell, Jr. [View Collection Details] [View Repository Details]

Southern Communities: Listening for a Change - History of Gay Men in Chapel Hill Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States. These interviews, conducted by Chris McGinnis, an undergraduate at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, for an independent study in the fall semester of 2000, give a perspective on gay life in Chapel Hill during the 1960s, 1970s, and 1980s. The interviews chronicle the development of the gay community in Chapel Hill and explore topics including early gay bars, social events and festivals of the gay community, gay organizations, and areas where gay men met and engaged in public sex. Included is an interview with Chapel Hill town council member Joseph A. Herzenberg. [View Collection Details] [View Repository Details]

Southern Communities: Listening for a Change - Miscellaneous Projects Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States. The Listening for a Change project encompasses an overview series of interviews exploring the dramatic changes in North Carolina since World War II and a variety of community-based projects: the New Immigrants Project contains interviews with community leaders, long-time residents, and Latin American immigrants in North East Central Durham, N.C., a traditionally African American neighborhood where many Latino immigrants have settled; the Jewish Immigrants Project explores the recollections of six Jewish immigrants who came to North Carolina during the 1940s, 1950s, and 1960s; the Cary Heritage Museum's Oral History Project documents the history of Cary, N.C., through interviews with members of prominent Cary families; business people, the retired police chief and fire chief; and former Page-Walker Hotel owners; the West Charlotte High School Project focuses on school desegregation in Charlotte, N.C. The Coolemee project focused on interviewing working class African American residents of Coolemee, N.C., about their memories of working in the textile mill and living in the town. Note that subsequent Listening for a Change projects have been cataloged separately. [View Collection Details] [View Repository Details]

Southern Communities: Listening for a Change - North Carolina Churches Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States. Interviews exploring church history and Christian life in North Carolina with a particular focus on African American denominations, race relations, and civil rights activism within church communities. [View Collection Details] [View Repository Details]

Southern Communities: Listening for a Change - School Desegregation in Charlotte, NC Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States. Interviews by Pamela Grundy focusing on school desegregation in Charlotte, N.C. The interviews examine both the process of desegregation and the effects it had on individuals, on race relations, and on the community as a whole. Unlike many southern communities, in which desegregation was largely thwarted by large-scale white flight to private institutions or suburban school districts, the combined Charlotte-Mecklenburg County school district managed to achieve a relatively stable racial and economic balance within its schools, chiefly because of an ambitious busing program. [View Collection Details] [View Repository Details]

Southern Communities: Listening for a Change - School Desegregation: Davidson Student Interviews Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States. Interviews conducted for a class on oral history and school desegregation taught by Pamela Grundy at Davidson College in the spring of 1999. They deal with aspects of school desegregation in the town of Mooresville, in Lincoln County, and in Davidson, N.C. The most comprehensive set of interviews deals with the history of the Ada Jenkins School, which was the African American school in Davidson until it was closed in 1965. [View Collection Details] [View Repository Details]

Southern Communities: Listening for a Change - School Desegregation: Davidson-Johnson C. Smith Student Interviews Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States. Interviews by members of a Davidson College-Johnson C. Smith University oral history class conducted by Pamela Grundy. In the spring of 2001, the class focused on school desegregation in Mecklenburg County, N.C. The interviews concentrate on desegregation at West Charlotte High School, a historically black school in the center of Charlotte, and North Mecklenburg High School, a historically white school in the northern part of Mecklenburg County. [View Collection Details] [View Repository Details]

Southern Communities: Listening for a Change - Segregation and Integration of North Carolina Athletics Programs Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States. This collection of interviews was conducted by Pamela Grundy as part of her research for a book on North Carolina athletics, Learning to Win: Sport, Education and Social Change in Twentieth-Century North Carolina (University of North Carolina Press, 2001). The interviews with John McLendon and James Ross deal largely with African American sport during segregation. Ross's interview also contains a good deal of material on African American community life generally. The interviews with William Friday and Susan Shackelford deal with athletics and integration. The Shackelford interview focuses on the integration of high school cheerleading, and also contains some observations about school integration in general. [View Collection Details] [View Repository Details]

Southern Communities: Listening for a Change - Southern Louisiana Environmentalism Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States. Interviews exploring environmentalism in Louisiana. Eugene Ford and Paul Francke, undergraduate students at the University of Chicago, conducted the interviews in August 2000, while they were working as summer interns with the Southern Oral History Program. [View Collection Details] [View Repository Details]

Southern Communities: Listening for a Change - Stephens-Lee High School, Ashville, NC Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States. Interviews by Kelly Navies explore the history of Stephens-Lee High School in Asheville, N.C. Built in 1923, Stephens-Lee was for many decades western North Carolina's only secondary school for African Americans. The school drew students from Buncombe, Henderson, Madison, Yancey, and Transylvania counties, and represented a focal point and a key source of pride for the extended African American community in the state's western region. In 1965, however, the all-white school board closed Stephens-Lee as part of its desegregation plan, and, in 1975, the entire multi-building campus, except for the gymnasium, was bulldozed. Navies interviewed former faculty, administrators, and students of Stephens-Lee to collect memories of the school and to assess the impact of desegregation and the school's closing on the black community in western North Carolina. [View Collection Details] [View Repository Details]

Southern Communities: Listening for a Change - Terra Ceia Community Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States. Interviews focusing on the life histories and experiences of residents in Terra Ceia, a Dutch community founded in Beaufort County, N.C., in the 1930s. The people of Terra Ceia have been successful farmers of flowers, soybeans, corn, and other crops, and have created and sustained several community institutions, including the Terra Ceia Christian Reformed Church, the Terra Ceia Christian School, and an annual Dutch festival. [View Collection Details] [View Repository Details]

Southern Communities: Listening for a Change - Tobacco, History, and Memory: Storytelling and Cultural Grieving in Eastern North Carolina Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States. This collection of interviews by historians Lu Ann Jones and Charlie Thompson explores the dramatic changes in eastern North Carolina tobacco farming and farm communities since World War II. In addition to tracing the history of growing, cultivating, harvesting, and selling tobacco, interviewees speculate about what current developments in tobacco politics may mean for the future of tobacco farming. [View Collection Details] [View Repository Details]

Southern Communities: Listening for a Change - Tradition and Development in Madison County's I-26 Corridor Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States. This collection of interviews by Rob Amberg documents the construction of a nine-mile section of Interstate 26. Amberg explored the history of daily life in the once isolated community of eastern Madison County and considered the consequences of highway development on community interaction and sense of place. Interviewees include the county sheriff; a probation officer; an environmental activist; the resident highway engineer of the I-26 Corridor project; self-described hippies who moved to Madison County in the early 1970s to live off the land; the mayor of Mars Hill, N.C.; and the town manager of Mars Hill, N.C. [View Collection Details] [View Repository Details]

Southern Communities: Listening for a Change - Voices after the Deluge: Oral History Investigations of the Great North Carolina Flood Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States. Interviews with flood victims, relief workers, ministers, farmers, farm workers, small-business owners, environmental monitors, and political leaders in eastern North Carolina about the devastating flooding in the aftermath of Hurricane Floyd. In the fall of 1999, soon after the flood, the Southern Oral History Program set out to document the catastrophe as part of its Listening for a Change initiative. Accompanied by photographer Rob Amberg, project coordinator Charlie Thompson led the effort to assess the environmental, political, and economic consequences of the disaster, as well as its impact on individual lives. Many broad themes emerged from Thompson's interviews: the sweeping toll of the flood on human lives; the disruptions to community and sense of place; the character of political response to the disaster at local, state, and national levels; public health and environmental issues arising from the flooding; the effect of the disaster on the region's most vulnerable residents, including children, the elderly, and lower-income families; and the experiences of relief workers. [View Collection Details] [View Repository Details]

Southern Communities: Miscellaneous Projects Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States. Interviews exploring the meaning of community and the role of historical memory. Cane Creek interviews relate to the controversy between residents of Cane Creek, N.C., a dairy farming community in Orange County, and the Orange County Water and Sewer Authority (OWASA) over the proposal to construct a reservoir that would flood Cane Creek farms. The interviews document from many perspectives this instance of the transformation of rural life and the conflicts between political, social, and environmental needs that affect the course of urban growth. Coastal Carolina interviews focus on North Carolina counties where World War II defense industries and military bases sparked rapid and unprecedented change, when the coast, previously a land of sharecroppers, small farmers, fishing villages, and timber camps, was transformed as thousands of civilian workers poured into industry; women and African Americans entered skilled occupations for the first time. White Furniture Company of Mebane, N.C., interviews are with former employees and Mebane residents about the history of the company and its importance to the town of Mebane. When White Furniture Company closed its doors in 1993, Mebane lost one of the oldest operating furniture factories in the South. Hindu Temple in Morrisville, N.C., interviews are with first and second generation Indian-Americans living within the Raleigh-Durham-Chapel Hill area. Interviewees discuss the desire to preserve Indian culture and heritage in the United States, generational differences in the Indian-American community, and gender roles among Indian-Americans, as well as Hindu religious beliefs and practices. [View Collection Details] [View Repository Details]

Southern Politics: Bass-DeVries Interviews, 1973-1975 Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States. The Bass-DeVries group of interviews includes discussions with political leaders, journalists, editors, party officials, political scientists, campaign directors, union officials, civil rights leaders, and congresspeople from eleven southern states: Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, and Virginia. These interviews were conducted as part of a study of politics in the South between 1945 and 1974. The study produced a book called The Transformation of Southern Politics: Social Change and Political Consequence Since 1945 (Basic Books, 1976). [View Collection Details] [View Repository Details]

Southern Politics: North Carolina Politics, 1994- Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States. These interviews are part of a North Carolina politics project begun in 1994 as part a series of six projects aimed at understanding how North Carolinians have dealt with the changes that have transformed the state since the Great Depression. These projects were launched with a gift from Walter Royal Davis which enabled the Southern Oral History Program and the Academic Affairs Library to establish the Davis Oral History Fund. The other projects focus on University history; women's leadership and grassroots activism; business history; the broadcast media; and memory and community studies. [View Collection Details] [View Repository Details]

Southern Politics: Southern Liberalism, 1990-1991 Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States. These interviews were conducted in late 1990 and early 1991 by John Egerton as part of the research for his book on the post-World War II era and the opportunities that era presented for positive action on civil rights. Included are interviews with individuals who were involved in various ways in the civil rights struggle, including former governor James P. Coleman, historians C. Vann Woodward and John Hope Franklin, editor Virginius Dabney, and activists Virginia Durr, Daisy Bates, Grace Hamilton, and many others. [View Collection Details] [View Repository Details]

Southern Women Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States. Interviews in this series focus on women's participation in movements for social change. The idea for a series of interviews with southern women originated with Jacquelyn Hall's study, Revolt Against Chivalry (Columbia University Press, 1979), which looks at the role of women in the anti-lynching movement of the Depression decade. Other interviews, financed by a 1974 Rockefeller Foundation grant to the Southern Oral History Program, expanded this focus to include labor relations, race relations, and reform movements. [View Collection Details] [View Repository Details]

Special Research Projects: African American Converts to the Mormon Faith Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States. Interviews conducted by University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill religious studies major Barbara Copeland as a part of her senior research project. The oral histories explore the reasons why African American interviewees converted to the Mormon faith. Interviews marked with an asterisk (*) are restricted. [View Collection Details] [View Repository Details]

Special Research Projects: Bruce Hartford Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States. Interview with Bruce Hartford, a veteran civil rights movement activist in Alabama, who became involved in the peace movement in Southeast Asia and the labor and communist movements in the San Francisco Bay Area in the late 1960s and 1970s. A copy of this interview has been deposited with the Bruce Hartford collection at the State Historical Society of Wisconsin in Madison. The interviewer conducted another interview with Hartford for the Martin Luther King, Jr., Papers Project at Stanford University. An additional interview with Hartford is available at http://www.crmvet.org/. [View Collection Details] [View Repository Details]

Special Research Projects: Carol Woods Retirement Community, Chapel Hill, N.C. Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States. Situated on 120 wooded acres in Chapel Hill, N.C., Carol Woods is an accredited, not-for-profit continuing care retirement community where residents live in cottages or apartments. Carol Woods opened its doors to its first residents in July 1979, with a second group of residents moving in November. These interviews with residents and staff members of the Carol Woods Retirement Community document the founding and early history of Carol Woods. The interviews were conducted by members of the Ad hoc Committee on the Early History of Carol Woods of the Carol Woods Residents Association. This committee was appointed to develop a history of the community on the occasion of its twentieth anniversary. Based on the interviews, Iris Friederich wrote Pioneering at Carol Woods. [View Collection Details] [View Repository Details]

Special Research Projects: Contemporary Funeral Traditions in the Gullah Community of St. Helena, S.C. Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States. Recordings by Michelle McCullers of interviews with members of the Gullah community on St. Helena, S.C., and of funeral services there. RESTRICTION: Recordings of Jack Johnson and William Marshel may not be quoted or cited. [View Collection Details] [View Repository Details]

Special Research Projects: Gateway Transitional Families Program Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States. Life history interviews with graduates and dropouts from the Gateway Transitional Families Program. The Gateway Program was authorized by Section 126 of the Housing and Community Development Act of 1987 (Public Law 100-242, approved 5 February 1988), which allowed the Charlotte Housing Authority (CHA) to develop a program to help public housing residents become socially and economically self-sufficient so that they could buy their own homes. Public housing residents and people on the public housing waiting list entered the program and typically spent two years getting the education they needed to obtain jobs that paid at least $8.00 per hour. They could spend up to another five years strengthening their employment skills and increasing their incomes. Savings were encouraged through the use of escrow savings accounts, where a portion of the participant's rent goes into a bank account for the purpose of saving for a down payment for a home. [View Collection Details] [View Repository Details]

Special Research Projects: Hindu Community in the Raleigh-Durham Area Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States. Jennifer Saunders conducted interviews for her masters thesis at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill about the development of the Hindu community in the Raleigh-Durham area and the role of the Hindu temple in this process. Interviews focus on the change and development of the Indian community in the United States, especially within North Carolina. The role of the temple receives special emphasis as a place where community can be built and a site where diverse Asian religious and cultural traditions can integrate with each other. [View Collection Details] [View Repository Details]

Special Research Projects: Integration and Health Care in North Carolina Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States. Karen Kruse Thomas, a Ph.D. candidate in history at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, conducted these interviews as part of a series of interviews with North Carolina health professionals about the origins and growth of the modern health care system, focusing on integration and its effects on health policy. The interviews contain descriptions of medical training and experiences with a focus on changes in medicine brought about by desegregation, new technology, "socialized medicine" and Medicare, and federal health care programs. Special attention is given to the experiences and activism of African American medical students and African American practitioners. There is also a strong focus on the University of North Carolina School of Medicine. [View Collection Details] [View Repository Details]

Special Research Projects: Latinos in North Carolina Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States. Enrique Murillo, a Ph.D. candidate in the Social Foundations of Education program at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, has research interests in diversity, identity, and the social construction of Latino communities. In these interviews, interviewees reveal their experiences as Mexican nationals migrating to North Carolina. Discussion includes agricultural work, community involvement (especially with the Catholic Church), the change in Latino and Latina roles, and subsequent identity changes caused by different status and circumstance. Other important themes include family and education. [View Collection Details] [View Repository Details]

Special Research Projects: Life Review (1997) Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States. Interviews conducted by students in an oral history course taught by Alicia Rouverol at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in the fall of 1997. Included are interviews with a history professor at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, with a Japanese immigrant to North Carolina, with a paramedical technologist at Lincoln Hospital in Durham, N.C., and other North Carolina residents. Interviews marked with an asterisk (*) are restricted. [View Collection Details] [View Repository Details]

Special Research Projects: Life Review (2000) Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States. Interviews conducted by students in an oral history course taught by Alicia Rouverol at Duke University in the fall of 2000. This diverse collection includes interviews with German immigrants, recovering drug addicts, and individuals struggling with long-term illness, such as HIV. Interviews marked with an asterisk (*) are restricted. [View Collection Details] [View Repository Details]

Special Research Projects: Lily Mae Ledford Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States. Lisa J. Yarger, graduate student in the Curriculum of Folklore at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, conducted these interviews as part of her research for a masters thesis on the life and performing career of musician Lily May Ledford. Ledford was the most well-known member of the Coon Creek Girls, an all-girl hillbilly string band. The interviews offer insights into the lives of mountain women, folk life, women musicians, Depression era radio, the folk revival, and touch on Renfro Valley and manager John Lair. [View Collection Details] [View Repository Details]

Special Research Projects: Middle Eastern Female Immigrants in North Carolina Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States. Interviews conducted in April-May 2002 by students in Sarah Shields's History 195 class at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill: Women in the Middle East, with women from the Middle East who now live in North Carolina. Shields's students interviewed these immigrants about their life experiences both in the Middle East and in the United States. Interviews marked with an asterisk (*) are restricted. [View Collection Details] [View Repository Details]

Special Research Projects: New Hope Community Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States. Interviews conducted by Kieran Taylor about the history of and community life in the New Hope community in Orange County, N.C., near Chapel Hill, N.C. Interviews discuss Blackwood and Strayhorn family history, history of the Blackwood farm, truck farming, farm life, their church community, and education, among other topics. Nannie Blackwood also described her work as a nurse at Watts Hospital in Durham, N.C. [View Collection Details] [View Repository Details]

Special Research Projects: North Carolina Communities - Montagnard Refugees from Vietnam Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States. Interviews by Thomas Pearson examining life histories of Montagnard refugees from Vietnam who have settled in North Carolina. [View Collection Details] [View Repository Details]

Special Research Projects: Remembering Black Main Streets Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States. Interviews with residents, chiefly African American business owners, of Savannah, Ga., and Greensboro, N.C., inquiring into the fate of southern black business in the wake of urban renewal and desegregation. folders R-iii through R-vi contain background information about Savannah and Greensboro. [View Collection Details] [View Repository Details]

Special Research Projects: The African American Working Class, 1930s-1950s Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States. William Jones, graduate student in history at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, conducted interviews that reveal the experiences of the African American working class during the shift from agriculture to industrialization in the 1930s to 1950s. Race relations within textile mills and the lumber industry in Elizabethtown, N.C., Chapman, Ala., and Bogalusa, La., are explored, as are diversities, tensions, and leadership within labor unions. African American leadership during the Elizabethtown, N.C., strike and several strikes in Chapman, Ala., are also discussed. Jones added to his research by interviewing the Green brothers, owners of the Green Brothers Lumber Company in Elizabethtown, N.C., and Mason McGowin, son of the McGowins who operated the W. T. Smith Company in Chapman, Ala. In Alabama and Louisiana, Jones also asked some interviewees about leisure time activities, including music and dancing. [View Collection Details] [View Repository Details]

Special Research Projects: Tobacco Interviews, Duke Homestead Education and History Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States. Six interviews conducted for the Duke Homestead Education and History Corporation on the culture and history of tobacco auctioneering, a profession that has undergone enormous changes during the past decade. Also included is an interview with Fred Bond, former mayor of Cary, N.C., and long-time head of the Flue-Cured Tobacco Cooperative Stabilization Corporation. [View Collection Details] [View Repository Details]

Special Research Projects: War on Poverty in North Carolina Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States. Erika LeMay, graduate student in the Department of History, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, conducted these interviews for her masters thesis on the war on poverty in North Carolina. Her focus was the grassroots organization of the People's Program on Poverty (PPOP) in northeastern North Carolina. [View Collection Details] [View Repository Details]

University of North Carolina Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States. This series contains interviews relating to the history of the University of North Carolina. It was originally established as part of the celebration of the University's bicentennial. The bicentennial interviews, conducted by various interviewers before and during the University of North Carolina's Bicentennial Celebration, are chiefly concerned with the history of the University. Some interviews focus on specific aspects of University life; others document the birth and growth of particular schools, institutes, or programs within the University; and others record more general information about the institution. Each interviewee brings his or her own perspective to the telling of the University's story. [View Collection Details] [View Repository Details]